McCall Wines: Feeling Rustic May 21, 2017

http://mccallwines.com/

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Although they are right off Main Road, when you pull around to the back you feel as though you are in the country.

Although they are right off the Main Road, there is a rustic feeling to the McCall Wines tasting room and property, a sense of peace and quiet—at least when it is not crowded.  Part of this is due to the tasting room itself, located in a former horse barn, with the stables repurposed as tasting alcoves, and the other part is the lawn outside, dotted with picnic tables and adjacent to the vines.

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Inside tasting area, in a repurposed horse stall.

On this sunny afternoon, we shared the place with several other couples and small groups.  We could have stood at the bar or sat inside at a table, but we decided that the sun had been making a rare enough appearance that we needed to sit outside and enjoy the pretty day.  Mrs. McCall brought us our tastes, except when we decided to pop in and get them ourselves.  She served them two at a time, in a two-ounce pour that felt quite generous.

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Part of the outside area, with a view of the vines.

The menu offers four choices:  Blancs, four whites for $12; Corchaug, four reds for $16; Premium, a mixture of two whites and two reds for $14; and Estate, four of their higher priced wines for $20.  They also offer a small menu of cheese and crackers, and request no outside food on Fridays-Sundays.  We decided to do a shared tasting of the whites and then the Corchaug reds (named for the Native American name for Cutchogue).  We had high hopes for the reds, since McCall had started out only making red wines, but we were also pleasantly surprised by how much we liked the whites.

  1. 2016 Marjorie’s Rosé    $18

Yesterday we attended a Case Club event at Croteaux Vineyards, our standard for North Fork rosés, so we had a recent comparison in mind when we tasted this mostly merlot pink wine.  It was quite different from the two Croteaux wines we had sampled, but fine in its own way.  The aroma had almost as much minerality as strawberry smell, and the taste also balanced minerals and sweetness, though a bit sweeter than we like.  My husband said it reminded him of pancakes with strawberry syrup.  Well, maybe not that sweet.  This is a rosé one could enjoy sipping well-chilled, though I prefer the leaner style of Croteaux.  (The wine is named for Mr. McCall’s mother.)

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  1. 2015 Sauvignon Blanc    $24

Mrs. McCall informed us that this was made in the French style, like a Sancerre wine (think sauvignon blanc=Sancerre and chardonnay=Chablis).  Good choice.  Although it did not have much aroma, it had some lovely tastes of citrus and kiwi and maybe gooseberry as well, plus some minerality and even a bit of salt.  Refreshing, was my tasting buddy’s summation.  We liked it.

  1. 2015 Chardonnay Unoaked        $18

This is a pretty typical North Fork steel-fermented chardonnay, with citrus tastes and just a touch of sweetness.  The aroma reminded me of wet rocks, with almost a chemical note.  It’s a fairly tasty steel chardonnay, and might overpower a delicate fish.  However, it would have gone well with the fillets I made the other day which were topped with an anchovy and onion sauce (thank you, Marcella Hazan and Braun’s fish store).

  1. 2014 Chardonnay Reserve          $39

Not surprisingly, the oaked chardonnay smelled like Werther’s butterscotch candy, and tasted rather butterscotch-y as well.  Not my favorite, but I could appreciate that it has layers of flavor.

  1. 2013 Pinot Noir               $30

When I told my husband this was a light red that would pair well with roast chicken, he told me I needed to think of another food pairing.  Okay, I said, pork chops.  This reminded me of a Beaujolais, a picnic wine, though it has a bit of a tannic tingle that makes it a touch more interesting.

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These two Pinot Noirs look similar, but taste different.

  1. 2013 Pinot Noir Hillside               $39

When Mrs. McCall brought us our first red tastes, along with fresh glasses, she explained that this one is called “Hillside” because…the grapes are grown on a hillside.  Really.  But that’s not as simplistic as it sounds.  Because of the hilly location, this part of the vineyard has better drainage, which concentrates the flavors of the grapes.  Although it is similar to the other Pinot, the aroma is stronger and the taste features more dark fruit and is somewhat mellower, with a longer finish.  My husband noted that he wasn’t wearing socks, but if he were, they would not have been knocked off by this wine.  Good, but not exciting.

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  1. 2012 Merlot Reserve     $24

Does anyone still know what Cheracol is?  It was a cherry-flavored cough syrup I became quite familiar with in my pre-tonsillectomy youth. Fortunately, though this merlot smells like Cheracol, it doesn’t taste like it!  The wine is dry, with lots of tannins, and not a ton of fruit, with a long finish.  We’re thinking it could even use more time to age, and, as my tasting buddy opined, it “shows promise.”  If we had room in the cellar (well, we just bought a case of Croteaux rosé), we might have bought a bottle to keep for a few years.

  1. 2010 Merlot Reserve     $39

2010 has a reputation as a great year on the North Fork, especially for reds, and Mrs. McCall was quite enthusiastic about this wine—deservedly so.  I think the technical term is “yummy.”  The tannins are relatively soft, so my guess is one should drink it now.  The aroma is of cherry tempered by wood, and the taste has lots of complex fruits, while still being dry.  If we had stayed on and ordered some cheese to go with a full glass of wine, this would have been my choice (Instead we went home and sat on our porch with wine—a lovely Meritage from Coffee Pot Cellars–and cheese from Love Lane Cheese shop!).

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The tasting barn.

Reasons to visit:  lovely bucolic setting; calm place that limits groups; unusual tasting room; the 2015 Sauvignon Blanc, the 2010 Merlot Reserve; nice picnic tables for during the week if you want to bring some snacks.

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Pugliese: Choose Your Time Carefully October 28, 2016

http://www.pugliesevineyards.com/

In the summer, on a weekend, all of these seats would be filled.

In the summer, on a weekend, all of these seats would be filled.

We’ve driven past Pugliese Vineyards many times and not stopped in, because the parking lot was clearly full, as were the outdoor tables under an awning next to their pleasant fountain-centered pond.  However, on this blustery fall Friday there were only a couple of other cars in the lot, so in we went.

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We were immediately greeted by a friendly server behind the bar, who turned out to be a member of the Pugliese family (and also a neighbor of ours), and who pointed out “Mom,” who was busy decorating glasses with her signature flower paintings (which also adorn the attractive bottles).  She explained that the tasting consisted of any four tastes from their extensive menu for $12.  “This will take some time,” we laughingly informed her, so she gave us some space to discuss.  The menu offers tastes in four categories:  four Sparklings, seven Whites, seven Reds, and five Desserts.  We decided to each do a tasting so we could sample as many different wines as possible.  And we could easily return and do a completely different tasting!  Our server carefully pointed out which of the pair of tastes we should start with, and answered our questions about the wines, rinsing our glasses with water between tastes.

Two sparklers.

Two sparklers.

  1. 2010 Blanc de Noir Nature           $25.99

Since today is my birthday, it seemed appropriate to start with some sparkling wines, so we chose the first two on their list.  “This is a completely dry wine, with no residual sugar, made from pinot noir grapes,” we were told.  She wasn’t kidding.  Many American champagne-type wines err on the side of too much sweetness, but this one is totally crisp and very dry, with some vegetable aromas and tastes.  Nice acidity.  I don’t think I’d want this for a toast, but it would be good with soft flavorful cheeses (like a nice runny brie) or foie gras.

  1. 2010 Blanc de Blanc Brut $25.99

We like this one better, as is more complex with more fruit flavors, though still relatively dry and light.  It seems fizzier than the first, though this may be a consequence of how often each bottle was opened.  This would work fine if you were pouring sparkling wine for a toast.

Two whites. Note the attractive bottles.

Two whites. Note the attractive bottles.

  1. 2014 Pinot Grigio $17.99

This has more tropical fruit and pineapple aromas than I would expect from a pinot grigio, with some minerality, which we also find in the taste.  My husband says it has a “citrusy tingle.”  I think it would go well with something fatty, like pork belly.  “Really?” he says.  Yup.

  1. 2013 Riesling $14.99

By the way, notice the prices.  One reason this winery is so popular may be the reasonable prices on most of the wines.  The aroma is pleasantly flowery, with maybe a touch of mint.  I worry rieslings will be too sweet, but this one is not, with nice fruit and a touch of Meyer lemon at the end.  My tasting buddy waxes poetic, “Nice sitting-outside-kick-your-feet-up-easy-drinking wine.”  I think he’s already nostalgic for summer and sitting outside on the porch.

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  1. Bella Domenica $10.99

Since we often have pasta for dinner, we’re always on the lookout for reasonably priced reds, so we decide to try this one.  A blend of merlot and cabernet, it has nice aromas of dark plums, but the taste is both tart and light with not a lot of fruit.  It would be ok with burgers, but there’s not much to it.  “An excellent value,” says the menu.

  1. 2012 Sangiovese $16.99

“Long Island’s only Chianti,” says the menu about this wine, so of course we have to try it.  Meh.  We would not have said Chianti if we had tried it without the label, as it is rather light with not much to it.  Perhaps this is a grape that does not do well on Long Island.

Our final two tastes.

Our final two tastes.

  1. 2010 Merlot Reserve $16.99

Merlot, however, does do well, and this is a good example of that.  The aroma is a touch funky, with some forest floor and what my husband identifies as asparagus, but the taste is quite good.  Dark plum, we decide, dry, with nice acidity.  I could definitely see having this with pasta Bolognese, or perhaps some Neapolitan-style pizza (especially as the Pugliese family is originally from Naples).

  1. 2010 Sunset Meritage $34.99

50% merlot, 25% cabernet franc, 25% cabernet sauvignon=a Right Bank Bordeaux style.  2010 was a good year on Long Island, and this blend does not disappoint.  Again the aroma is a touch funky, but the taste is good, with plenty of tannins which make us think it could continue to age well.  Though it has the most interesting flavors of any wine we’ve had today, we feel $35 might be a bit more than we’d want to pay for this one.

Past the room with the tasting bar is a large room with gift items.

Past the room with the tasting bar is a large room with gift items.

Reasons to visit:  Good all-purpose winery with lots of room outside for groups; the Blanc de Blanc Brut, the Riesling, the Meritage; reasonable prices and a wide variety of wines many people will like; the creative gift packages of hand-painted glasses and bottles (which can be customized to order).

Photos of local sights are an unusual winery gift item.

Photos of local sights are an unusual winery gift item.

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Castello di Borghese: Oldie but Goodie July 30, 2016

Castello di Borghese:  Oldie but Goodie July 30, 2016

You can bring your own picnic to the outside tables, but no outside beverages.

You can bring your own picnic to the outside tables, but no outside beverages.

http://www.castellodiborghese.com/

“Yes,” our server said, “these grapes come from our 43-year-old vines.”  In North Fork terms, that’s ancient history, and since the older the vines supposedly the better the wines, we were quite interested in the Founder’s Field Sauvignon Blanc.  The Hargraves were the first to see the potential of grape vines on the North Fork, (then the Borghese family bought their vineyard) and wow, did they ever start something.  But in the wine business there is no resting on one’s laurels (or vines), so let’s see how they are doing today.

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The pleasant tasting room, with several areas, including a very large room which I would assume is mostly used for parties and such, offers two menus, of Estate and Reserve wines.  You can taste four of the Estate wines for $10 or five of any of their wines for $15.  Since there are quite a few choices on both menus, including reds, whites, rosés, and dessert wines, it took us a while to choose.  In fact, we could easily go back and do a completely different tasting in the near future.  We finally settled on one 5-sample tasting, of two whites and three reds.  Our server, though at first somewhat tentative about recommendations, began to give us some helpful guidance as we progressed.

The large back room boasts quite a gallery of art.

The large back room boasts quite a gallery of art.

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Another neat feature of the tasting room is their ever-changing display of art works.  They have a small selection of snacks for sale, but you can bring your own picnic and settle in at the outside tables.  Glasses of wine go for $9-12, depending on which you choose.

They have quite a display of awards they've won.

They have quite a display of awards they’ve won.

  1. Chardonette/CDB White             $12

Since we are always on the lookout for inexpensive whites for weekday meals, especially in the summer, we decided this would be a good place to start.  We were right.  A mixture of mostly chardonnay with some sauvignon blanc, this is a perfect light summery white, with aromas of herbs and minerals and a crisp taste with some acidity.  This is steel fermented, so don’t expect any buttery-ness.  The menu suggests matching it with hummus or “smoked beef tartare,” whatever that is.  I think it would be a nice aperitif, well iced, with some charcuterie and cheese, on the porch, in the summer.  We buy two bottles.

I think the label for the Chardonette goes perfectly with the wine.

I think the label for the Chardonette goes perfectly with the wine.

  1. 2013 Founder’s Field Sauvignon Blanc $29

What a contrast!  The Chardonette is a very non-serious white, while this one is quite serious.  Complex, with aromas of butter and honeysuckle, this is a combination of oaked and un-oaked sauvignon blanc, with the oaked portion spending two months in new French oak.  There’s a touch of citrus at the end, plus interesting layers of flavor, including gooseberry (which, now that I bought some at Briermere a few weeks ago, my husband agrees it tastes like).

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  1. 2014 Pinot Noir Reserve                 $50

The menu said 2013 Pinot Noir, but they were sold out of that, and after we discussed that change with our server he confessed that this was his favorite of their wines.  He does have expensive taste!  He brought us a new glass for the changeover to red.  “Mmmm,” said my husband.  Anything more enlightening to say, I asked?  We smell some cherry candy, taste dark fruits such as plums, plus nice tannins, and perhaps a trace of nutmeg.  This is a Burgundy, so we decide it would go well with Boeuf Bourguignon.  Making that according to Julia Child’s recipe is an all-day affair, so I guess if I put that much work into a dish it would warrant a bottle of this wine.

  1. 2013 Merlot Reserve $33

Our server informs us that this spends 14 months in French oak, which probably accounts for the trace of smoke we smell.  We also get plum and black cherry.  The wine is dry, with lots of tannins and good fruit, so it would be a good counterpoint to a fatty meat such as lamb.  My husband observes that it is very well balanced, with a good finish.  “Yum,” I add.

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  1. 2013 Cabernet Franc Reserve $44

As we discuss which wine to have to end our tasting, our server volunteers that this one is quite interesting, so we go with it.  He’s right (again).  We sniff and get fruit and a trace of tobacco, then sip and decide the taste is rich.  We taste dark cherries with a trace of smoke at the end, but not overwhelming, plus good tannins.  They suggest pairing with game, and I could see it with venison steaks.

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Bunches of lavender for sale.

Bunches of lavender for sale.

Reasons to go:  A nice calm tasting room plus picnic tables outside; the Chardonette, the Founder’s Field Sauvignon Blanc, the Pinot Noir Reserve; art on the walls.

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Macari: Still a Good One January 2, 2016

http://www.macariwines.com/

The entrance

The entrance

For our first winery of the new year, we headed to Macari, which we had last visited when it boasted the award of “Best Winery of 2014.”  We would have been back sooner, but cancelled our visits when the attractive tasting room proved too crowded and noisy for us.  This time, in the doldrums of January, there were still plenty of people, including a large group in the room off to one side, but we found a place at the bar and a smart and attentive server.

Plenty of space for large groups in the side room.

Plenty of space for large groups in the side room.

The menu offers three options—Estate, of four of their lower priced wines for $10; Cuvee, of five for $15; and Vintage, of five of their best wines for $20.  Since none of the lists overlapped, we decided to share two tastings, one of the Cuvee and one of the Vintage.  Because both menus included whites and reds of varying types, we wanted to alternate so as not to try to follow a riesling with a sauvignon blanc.  Why?  As we’ve learned, if you try to taste a light dry wine like a steel-fermented sauvignon blanc after a sweeter, more substantial wine like a riesling, you won’t be as able to appreciate the lighter wine.

Our server first wanted to pour our two tastings simultaneously, but after we explained the philosophy behind our preference she quickly caught on, and made sure to pour the wines in an order that made sense.    We were particularly impressed with her ability to keep track of what we were doing since she also was serving other customers and running off to the side room as well.  She also was enthusiastic about the wines, sharing her preferences and knowledge about the wine, only once having to resort to a “cheat sheet” to give us information we requested.

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As we sipped, we admired the nicely done holiday decorations and the attractive labels on the wines, and afterwards we browsed the small but good collection of wine-related gifts. Note they don’t allow outside foods, and sell a variety of snack and cheese items.   I’m listing the wines in the order in which we had them, marking the Vintage wines with an *.

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  1. Sauvignon Blanc ’14       $24

This is a steel –fermented sauvignon blanc, with an aroma that reminds me of the water in a vase after the flowers have begun to decay—which doesn’t sound all that appealing, but is fine when combined with citrus.  Good, we decide, nicely crisp, but delicate, with a touch of sweetness—perhaps more Meyer lemon than lemon.  Of course it would pair well with local oysters or clams, but if you had it with shrimp I would leave out the cocktail sauce, which would overwhelm this wine.

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  1. Sauvignon Blanc ’14 (concrete egg) $27

Ooh, this is just the sort of exercise I love: Trying two wines side by side, made from the same grapes, but treated differently.  In this case, “concrete egg” refers to the egg-shaped concrete cask they use to ferment the wine, our server explains, and adds that since concrete is more porous than steel but less porous than wood, and without the flavor added by a wood cask, the results are quite different and, she thinks, better.  We agree.  The aroma is complex, with perhaps a hint of nutmeg or other spices and a taste that is a touch sweeter without being too sweet, with some acidity and a taste of greengage plums.  No finish.  Mysteriously, the label bears the word “Lifeforce.”

  1. *Dos Aguas ’13 $27

“Dos Aguas” refers to the two waters between which the vineyards are located:  Peconic Bay and Long Island Sound.  Many people feel that these “two waters” contribute to the North Fork’s excellence as a grape-growing region, since they have the effect of moderating the climate.  This is a blend of chardonnay, viognier, riesling, and sauvignon blanc, and is another good wine.  The aroma makes me think of sticky fruits and the taste includes minerality, figs, and tangerines.  Though the riesling does contribute some sweetness, it is well balanced with some acidity.  It would go well with one of my favorite dishes, pasta tossed with a variety of seafood.

  1. *Riesling ’13 $23

Ah yes, we are definitely glad that we tasted this one last of the whites, as its sweetness would have interfered with appreciating the others.  This is the only wine, our server informs us, that uses grapes not grown on the estate, since the riesling grapes in this come from the Finger Lakes region (not unusual for Long Island wineries, as upstate is known for its good riesling).  The aroma is honey, the taste like a green apple on the sweeter side, like a Mutsu, not a Granny Smith.  “Toot suite,” jokes my husband, as he complains that this wine is sweeter than he likes.  It is sweeter than a dry riesling, but I don’t find it unpleasantly so.  With spicy food you’d welcome that flavor.

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  1. Merlot Estate $15

Burnt sugar?  Cinnamon toast?  We discuss the smell, which in any event is not typical for a Long Island merlot.  Our server lets us in on the secret that although this wine is more than 80% merlot it also has some syrah, cabernet franc, and cabernet sauvignon, which may help explain the aroma.  It may also explain the taste, which is quite good for an inexpensive merlot, and makes this a good choice for a table wine.  It is fairly soft, with no tannins and some acid, and would go well with veal or pork, rather than steak.

Full disclosure:  We already knew we like Sette.

Full disclosure: We already knew we like Sette.

  1. Sette NV $19

We are quite familiar with Sette, since we often order it in local restaurants.  In fact, we just shared a bottle of it at Michelangelo’s last week, when it went well with eggplant parmesan and pasta with sausage and broccoli rabe.  This is a blend of 50/50 merlot and cabernet franc (not of seven wines, as you might assume from the name, which instead refers to the town Settefratti, which was the home town of the Macari family).  The smell is warm, with some spice and wood, the taste cherry with again some acid but not much tannin.

Cute drawing on the Dos Aguas.

Cute drawing on the Dos Aguas.

  1. *Dos Aguas Red Blend ’10 $30

Blend?  Yes, of cabernet franc, cabernet sauvignon, and merlot.  We smell wet hay and wood, taste pleasant dark fruits. This is a soft, easy to drink red, and would be good, I opine, to sip while cooking—and ruining the food? theorizes my husband.  Ha.

  1. *Merlot Reserve ’10 $36

After aging 26 months in French oak, this wine has more tannins than the previous reds, with a typical merlot aroma of cherry plus oak.  Not powerful, but pleasant, this is a good wine if you want to introduce someone to Long Island merlots.

Apparently the Bergen Road is also available in a huge bottle.

Apparently the Bergen Road is also available in a huge bottle.

  1. *Bergen Road ’10 $46

Since I ask, our server looks up the proportions of this red blend:  56% merlot, 26% cabernet sauvignon, 13% cabernet franc, 3% malbec, and 2% petit verdot.  A Right Bank Bordeaux.  The color is quite dark, and so is the taste, with plenty of tannin and acid and delicious dark fruits.  Yum.

Block "E" looks and tastes very like a sherry.

Block “E” looks and tastes very like a sherry.

  1. Block “E” ’12 $32 (for a small bottle)

Ice wine is supposed to be made with grapes picked after the first frost, but since that frost tends to come pretty late on the North Fork (as in it just happened), instead the grapes are picked fairly late, when they have developed quite a bit of sugar, and then frozen before being made into a dessert wine.  In both color and taste this reminds us of a semi-sweet sherry, with a bit of a honey aroma.  When I ask, we are informed it is made from merlot, cabernet sauvignon, cabernet franc, and malbec grapes.  Good dessert wine, it would be nice with some almonds.

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Reasons to visit:  good all-around winery, with plenty of tasty options and a big room with tables for groups; nice selection of gifts; reasonable prices (if we didn’t have all the wine we need at the moment we would have bought several of the wines); the “concrete egg” Sauvignon Blanc, the Dos Aguas white and red, the Merlot Estate, the Sette, the Bergen Road.

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Macari Vineyards: Award Deserved? October 25, 2014

http://www.macariwines.com/

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Macari had been named the “Winery of the Year” at the 2014 New York Wine & Food Classic, so we were curious to see why.  According to the Classic website, the “award is presented to the winery with the best overall showing based on the level and number of awards in relation to entries.”

Macari has two tasting rooms, and on a previous try the one on Sound Avenue was too full to find a place at the tasting bar, so this time we tried the one on the Main Road.  Since it was a beautiful October day and every winery we passed seemed to have a full parking lot, we thought we’d have to put off our visit until the winter, but we were pleasantly surprised—though as we left it seemed the crowds were arriving!  Both tasting rooms are spacious and pleasant, with a nice selection of wine-related gifts and snack items.  Our servers were kept busy, but were very efficient and observant, and we never had to wait more than a moment or two for our next taste.  Also, as you will see, they noticed our seriousness about the wines and added a few extras, which turned out to be a great idea.

A view out the windows, with some of the gift items visible

A view out the windows, with some of the gift items visible

The tasting menu features three options:  a white flight of four wines for $8, a red flight of 4 wines for $15, and a Vintage flight of 5 wines for $20, with a combination of whites and reds.  Since we noticed that three of the Vintage wines were included in the other two tastings, we decided to opt for one white and then one red, sharing as we went along.

The tasting bar was crowded, but the servers did a good job of taking care of everyone.

The tasting bar was crowded, but the servers did a good job of taking care of everyone.

1.        Sauvignon Blanc 2012    $23

As usual, the tasting started off with their lightest white, a lemony and tart sauvignon.  The night before we had had an excellent Italian sauvignon, so we were making comparisons.  The Macari had, we felt, too little fruit taste to balance the acidity.  “Undistinguished,” said my husband, and I agreed.  It might be better with food.

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2.       Chardonnay Estate 2011               $19

This is their 100% stainless steel chard, so no oakiness.  We smell and taste ripe pear, though it doesn’t have tons of fruit taste.  It’s a good chard, reasonably dry, and would go well with a Long Island clam chowder.

3.       Collina Chardonnay                         $9.50

Noticing the price, we wonder whether this would be one to buy for everyday drinking.  Nope.  Though the aroma had pleasant notes of mineral and honeysuckle, the taste is actually bitter.  It is fermented 25% in oak, and the rest in steel, but we taste none of the buttery or vanilla notes one would expect.  We dump most of the taste!

4.       Riesling 2011                      $25 per carafe

The 2011 Riesling has not yet been bottled, so they’re serving from carafes.  Made from Finger Lakes grapes, it has some of that upstate taste I find hard to describe.  It smells like white grape juice!  Taste is not overly sweet, with some mineral and gooseberry notes, though it is fairly monochromatic.  My husband had recently been to a wine tasting of German and Long Island Rieslings, and felt this one did not measure up to the others he had had.

Our first "bonus" wine

Our first “bonus” wine

5.       Rosé 2013            $17

In the first indication that our seriousness has been observed, one server asks us if we like rosés, and then offers us a taste of theirs.  A blend of cabernet franc, pinot noir, and merlot, it has the usual strawberry aroma and taste, with again a fair amount of minerality.  There’s something flowery about it as well.  Though not as good as Croteaux, it is a fine rosé.

6.       Collina Merlot                    $9.50

New glass for the reds.  Our server calls this a “pizza pasta burger” wine, which the price would surely indicate.  “It’s not terrible,” says my tasting companion.  Talk about damning with faint praise!  But it is a very light red, with no depth or interest or finish.  It’s just there. We were, however, intrigued by the aroma, which I characterized as a cherry-flavored cigar.

Sette.  The size of the pour varied a bit.

Sette. The size of the pour varied a bit.

7.       Sette                     $19

This is their red blend, of 50/50 merlot and cabernet franc—not seven wines, as I thought based on the name.  Sette actually refers to the town Settefrati, a small town south of Rome, which is the home town of the Macari family.  Our server calls it their best seller, and I can see why.  The aroma is of dark brambly fruits, and the wine itself is light but very drinkable, perhaps with “Sunday gravy.”  By the way, it was served too cold, so we warmed the glass in our palms, which helped bring out the taste.

8.       Cabernet Franc 2008                       $35

I’ve heard people refer to a brininess as an expression of the Long Island terroir, but I never experienced it quite as forcefully as with the aroma of this wine.  Sea air!  Fortunately it does not taste salty, but rather of dark plums, and is our favorite so far.  Some tannins, a touch of oak.

9.       Dos Aguas 2008                 $27

Here the name refers to the two waters of the North Fork—Peconic Bay and Long Island Sound.  This is Macari’s Bordeaux blend, a mixture of 70% merlot, 17% cabernet sauvignon, 4% cabernet franc, 8% malbec, and the rest petit verdot.  Yes, I’d like this with steak frites, please.  It is our server’s favorite.  Not particularly complex, but good and quite drinkable, with plenty of fruit and spice aromas and flavors.

A line-up of reds.

A line-up of reds.

10.   2007 Merlot Reserve                      $36

So if you’re counting you realize that our tasting should be over, but after asking us what we thought of the Dos Aguas, our server decides we should try two more wines.  This is certainly better than most merlots, and 2007 was a good year.  We taste lots of dark fruits, and the aroma is delicious.

11.   2010 Bergen Road            $46

This one beats the bunch, as my grandmother used to say with the birth of each grandchild.  Another Bordeaux blend, or a Meritage, of 56% merlot, 26% cabernet sauvignon, 13% cabernet franc, 3% malbec, and 2% petit verdot, this one has aromas of Belgian dark chocolate and dark fruits.  OMG I say when I taste it.  Complex, with lots of tannins and yummy fruit.  We buy a bottle to put in the cellar!

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Reasons to visit:  you want an all-purpose winery with space for a large group or the intimacy of a conversation at the bar; you need to pick up a wine-related gift or buy a snack;  the 2010 Bergen Road; the 07 Merlot Reserve, the 08 Dos Aguas, the 08 Cabernet Franc;  did I mention the 2010 Bergen Road…

The Main Road building

The Main Road building

What a beautiful day.  In Greenport, every restaurant's outside tables were filled, and plenty of people opted for an outdoor tasting.

What a beautiful day. In Greenport, every restaurant’s outside tables were filled, and plenty of people opted for an outdoor tasting.

Pugliese: Limos Galore November 23, 2013

http://www.pugliesevineyards.com/

pug place

We thought we were safe.  Random November Saturday, chilly weekend following a drizzly Friday, just a little after noon—surely Pugliese would be quiet!  And indeed, when we arrived, there were only two limos in the parking lot, and several large parties clustered outside around the picnic tables.  We had passed Pugliese many times during the summer and opted not to go, given the crowded look of the place.  It’s not that we’re misanthropes; it’s just that we prefer to do our tastings in a calm, peaceful atmosphere.  Actually, the grounds around the tasting room are quite pretty, with a scenic pond down in a hollow near the outside tables.

We scanned the menu:  4 tastes for $7.00, $8 for a glass, sangria (from a large vat at one end of the bar) $10 per glass, and beer on tap.  Also they have a cheese tray for $13.  There were many choices—four sparkling wines, four whites, seven reds, and five dessert wines.  The sparkling wines seemed to be very popular with the groups of women, and we heard at least one young man become quite happy at the prospect of having a beer instead of wine.  We decided to share eight different tastes, which our server agreed was a good choice, and she noted that the fourth white was quite sweet, and would probably not be to our taste.  Good call.  I also noted that they had many gift baskets on offer, including hand-painted wine glasses, t-shirts, and other small items, plus the inevitable bags of North Fork potato chips.

1)      2012 Pinot Grigio                             $17.99

In general, I like Pinot Grigios.  This one was just okay, with a vegetable aroma, perhaps asparagus, and a dry, grassy taste.  Not much finish.  When I admire the pretty label, the server notes that another woman there designed them.

We admired the pretty bottles.

We admired the pretty bottles.

2)       2012 Chardonnay Gold                 $12.99

Though this is a steel-fermented Chard, it has a bit of a creamy taste, with nice fruit and a dry finish.  I would say, especially given the price, it is quite buyable.

3)      2012 Riesling                                     $13.99

The honeysuckle aroma is there, but faint.  I wouldn’t actually have realized right away that this is a Riesling, but I did guess (correctly!) that it included grapes from upstate.  Not sure how to describe that upstate flavor, but it is a bit sweet and…grape-juicy.  Just okay.

pug white

4)      Bella Domenica                                                $9.99

We were going to skip this one, but our server—as she rinsed our glasses between each taste—recommended that we try it.  People don’t choose it because of the price, but it’s actually a very nice wine, she said.  And she was right.  It is described as a red table wine, a Merlot/Cabernet blend, and is a perfectly acceptable everyday red.  It would be fine with pasta, or as a picnic wine.  A summery red, with a cherry aroma and nice berry taste, this is a simple wine (as are most of their wines.  Nothing complex or layered here.)  I was about to ask the story behind the name when several large parties suddenly arrived, changing the atmosphere from calm to loud and boisterous.

5)      2009 Sangiovese                              $16.99

We had to try this one, as they are the only vineyard on the North Fork to grow the Sangiovese—a.k.a. Chianti—grape.  The color is a light red, and the taste is similarly light.  Not much to it, my husband notes.  Although it is also an acceptable everyday wine, you wouldn’t necessarily peg it as a Chianti, as it is less robust than you’d expect it to be.

The Sangiovese

The Sangiovese

6)      2009 Cabernet Franc                       $16.99

As with all their wines, we feel this one is also underflavored and relatively simple.  We smell a bit of damp forest, maybe some red candy.

7)      2006 Sunset Meritage                    $24.99

Since we’ve been somewhat disappointed so far, we decide to skip to their pricier—though still reasonably priced for Long Island—reds, and move to their Bordeaux blend:  Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon.  Yay, finally, a wine with something to it!  But not a lot.  The color is nicely dark, the aroma is berries and fruit, and the taste is also of berries with a trace of oak, but compared to other Bordeaux we’ve had this has no depth or layers of flavor.

8)      2007 Merlot Reserve                      $29.99

No sulfites, boasts the tasting notes.  Very dark color, black cherry flavor, no barnyard aromas; this wine may not be worth $30, but it is quite good.

They are having a sale, a case of Bella Domenica for only $75.99.  We are in need of some everyday reds, so we get a case.  No reduction in the tasting fee, by the way, and our server points us to a pile of cartons and suggests we help ourselves, after first checking to be sure the case we take actually has 12 bottles.  By this time we are ready to leave, for the room has become quite noisy as more groups arrive.  But as our server pointed out, without the groups we’d be the only ones there, so they do depend on the limo crowds.  In addition, we discussed the fact that these young people may be developing a lifetime affection for wine, and could be customers for Pugliese in the future.

Lots of limos

Lots of limos

Reasons to visit:  you want to sit outside in a pretty setting; the reasonable prices for the wines; the Chardonnay, the Bella Domenica, the 07 Merlot Reserve; you like a boisterous party atmosphere.

Pretty pond

Pretty pond